Analyzing back and front pay loss allegations for a highly paid individual or executive can be involved. These individuals’ compensation may include employee stock options, company performance based bonuses, and other variable income.

We are adept at analyzing back and front pay allegations of executives and highly paid individuals.

Highly compensated employees frequently have a component of their income that is tied to sales and revenue goals.

In these instances, projections of the company’s performance as well as individual-specific employment factors, such as job performance, are typically considered in the analysis of the alleged back and front pay losses.

We use information from sources such as personnel files, court records, employer financial records, product market data and projections, and labor market data to study the value of the alleged losses.

Read:
Valuing Employee Stock Options and Restricted Stock Grants(pdf)
Using the binomial model to value employee stock options: an example (pdf)

Case examples:
Byerlotzer v. Key Energy
Virant v. Encana Oil

Executives and highly compensated employees frequently have a component of their compensation that is determined by the performance of the company and the achievement of specified revenue and profit goals.

Projections of the company’s performance are factors to consider in addition to individual job performance in the analysis of the alleged back and front pay losses in these cases.

In these types of analyses, we use information from sources such as annual reports, financial records, product market data, court records, and labor market data to study the alleged losses.

Read:
Valuing Employee Stock Options and Restricted Stock Grants(pdf)
Using the binomial model to value employee stock options: an example (pdf)

Case examples:
Byerlotzer v. Key Energy
Virant v. Encana Oil

Employee stock options are a common component of compensation packages for executives and highly-paid employees.

The value of employee stock options depends on a number of factors, including the underlying stock price, stock price volatility, vesting time, and the expected employee job tenure.

In these types of analyses, we use information from sources such as annual reports, financial records, product market data, court records, and labor market data to study the alleged loss of employee stock option value.

Read:
Valuing Employee Stock Options and Restricted Stock Grants(pdf)
Using the binomial model to value employee stock options: an example (pdf)

Case examples:
Byerlotzer v. Key Energy
Virant v. Encana Oil