Big Data. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Survey data. Employment Big Data.  Those are all things that calculating worklife expectancy for U.S. workers requires.  Worklife expectancy is similar to life expectancy and indicates how long a person can be expected to be active in the workforce over their working life.  The worklife expectancy figure takes into account the anticipated to time out of the market due to unemployment, voluntary leaves, attrition, etc.

Overall the goal of our recent work is to update the Millimet et al (2002) worklife expectancy paper and account for more recent CPS data.

The data for all years is shown below.  Ultimately there were over 590,000 data points used in the analysis.

Table 2.  Matched CPS Sample Sizes 1993-2013
Female Male
Year Less than High School High School Some College College Less than High School High School Some College College Total
1993 3,766 7,326 4,898 3,452 3,376 5,619 4,280 3,935 36,652
1994 3,539 7,019 5,357 3,619 3,097 5,477 4,411 4,013 36,532
1995 3,082 6,161 5,086 3,545 2,664 4,815 4,086 3,938 33,377
1997 3,079 6,172 4,771 3,488 2,723 4,857 3,926 3,723 32,739
1998 2,839 6,113 4,873 3,672 2,694 4,952 3,995 3,834 32,972
1999 2,709 6,027 4,987 3,770 2,513 4,830 4,134 3,923 32,893
2000 2,692 5,930 5,009 3,915 2,463 4,899 4,052 4,204 33,164
2001 2,545 5,806 4,971 3,901 2,458 4,919 4,232 4,016 32,848
2003 1,096 3,218 2,579 2,411 1,019 2,701 2,122 2,470 17,616
2004 2,579 6,372 5,803 5,009 2,394 5,307 4,745 4,819 37,028
2005 2,039 5,378 5,146 4,673 1,867 4,632 4,270 4,285 32,290
2006 2,297 5,500 5,608 4,657 2,131 4,953 4,263 4,389 33,798
2007 2,147 5,730 5,466 5,060 2,076 5,133 4,344 4,592 34,548
2008 2,159 5,659 5,787 5,281 2,040 5,212 4,593 4,826 35,557
2009 2,027 5,637 5,780 5,556 2,023 5,062 4,776 4,976 35,837
2011 1,845 4,844 5,106 5,136 1,786 4,603 4,176 4,432 31,928
2012 1,733 4,849 4,930 4,956 1,779 4,693 4,151 4,616 31,707
2013 1,658 4,542 5,061 5,109 1,668 4,579 4,271 4,650 31,538
Total 43,831 102,283 91,218 77,210 40,771 87,243 74,827 75,641 593,024

Notes:

The CPS data was matched using the algorithm similar to Millimet et al (2002) and Peracchi and Welch (1995).  Households in rotation 1-4 were matched using the household identifier number to the same household in rotations 5-8 of the following year. Individuals had to have the same sex, race and be a year older in rotation 5-8 to be determined a match.